What Are the Most Common Slip and Fall Accidents?

How Can I Prove a Slip and Fall Accident?Slip and fall accidents result in thousands of traumatic injuries every year. Here are some of the most common types of slip and falls, and somethings you can watch out for.

  1. Wet and Uneven Surface

This type of accident accounts for 55% of slip and falls every year. When you’re walking anywhere watch out for the following (particularly if you’re in unfamiliar surroundings):

  • Loose floorboards
  • Defective sidewalks
  • Parking lot potholes
  • Cluttered floors
  • Torn carpeting
  • Recently mopped or waxed areas
  • Loose mats
  • Any place where water or other liquid has accumulated
  • Rundown or poorly constructed stairways
  1. Adverse Weather Conditions

Bad weather causes a significant number of slip and fall accidents every year. While winter weather isn’t the only culprit, it does present the most common hazards. Watch for patches of ice, sidewalks and staircases that haven’t been shoveled or salted, and black ice on the pavement.

  1. Improper training in the workplace

Slip and falls are common in the workplace, particularly the construction industry; and they frequently result in litigation. When employees in high risk industries are not given proper safety training or procedures, the risk of slip and falls and other injuries goes up exponentially. Employees should make sure that they receive proper training on all equipment and tools they are expected to use.

  1. Nursing Home Neglect

Sadly, slip and fall accidents are common in nursing homes. The elderly often have an impaired sense of balance which leaves them especially vulnerable to slipping and falling. This risk is compounded by the fact that the chances of a slip and fall injury being life-threatening are also increased in the case of elderly adults. If you have a loved one in a nursing home, make sure the administrators and aides are properly assisting and monitoring their residents.

  1. Footwear

The National Floor Safety Institute has found that 24% of all slip and falls are caused by the wearing of improper footwear. The major risk factor here is when shoes or boots do not offer the right kind of traction for the conditions at hand.

How Can I Prove a Slip and Fall Accident?

How Can I Prove a Slip and Fall Accident?Thousands of people are injured in slip and fall accidents every year. These include slipping on a slick surface, falling down stairs, tripping over an object, or stepping in a hole. Proving fault in a slip and fall accident is often difficult, but if you are injured you should know how to go about making a case.

There are four basic elements that must be proven to win a slip and fall claim. Simply because you had an accident on someone else’s property is not necessarily enough to mount a strong case. It must be shown that the property owner had a responsibility to maintain the premises and address any harmful conditions (within reason). In other words, could have the property owner have prevented the accident? While property owners will not necessarily be held liable for something a reasonable person would have avoided, they are expected to take reasonable steps to keep their property free of potentially harmful or unsafe conditions. Courts will often balance the property owner’s duty to keep the premises safe against the care that the accident victim should have used.

To prevail in a slip and fall claim, you will likely have to show one of the following:

  • The property owner should have known that the dangerous condition existed, i.e. because a reasonable person in the property owner/employer’s position would have known about such a condition and addressed it.
  • The property owner did in fact know that the dangerous condition existed, but made no attempts to address it.
  • The property owner caused the dangerous condition.

The first element (whether a reasonable person would have known about the condition) is the one most often litigated, and the most difficult to prove. Here are some questions to ask when trying to assess the reasonable person question:

  • Did the dangerous condition exist long enough that a reasonable property owner could have/would have taken action to address it?
  • Did the property owner have a policy or procedures in place to routinely check for potential hazards or safety issues?
  • Was there a reasonable justification for the existence of the dangerous condition?
  • Could the dangerous condition be mitigated through preventative measures?
  • Was poor lighting or visibility a factor in the accident?